Magic: The Gathering or Stocks?

Last week I posted about Lego’s 7,500+ Piece Millennium Falcon set. You can find one for about $1,000. While on the topic of shopping, I just saw a set of Magic: The Gathering cards going for $199,998 on Ebay. I don’t know anything about the game and I’m not qualify to provide any insights on the cards. However, I do know something about investments and this sounds like a lot of money for a bunch of playing cards. I remember seeing people playing in the 90s, who knew that your cards would be worth something one day? I know that rare things could be worth of money over time, but I had no idea that very expensive playing cards were a thing. For the people who bought packs when it was cheap, good for them. I should have bought that instead of hockey cards. My hockey cards are worth as much as the paper it was printed on.

It’s hard to make sense of sound financial advice when you see things like that. If you want a successful retirement,  we are told to buy some stocks, some bonds, some gold, keep some GICs and invest in some non-correlated assets. We are constantly reminded about how important a diversify portfolio is.

Or you can forget about all that and buy Magic: The Gathering booster packs.

Magic The GatheringMagic The Gathering 2.JPG

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LEGO’s 7,500+ Piece Millennium Falcon

I just ran into this on the Internet and here’s a little weekend project in case you have lots of free time. It’s back in stock but they fly out of shelve very fast, explaining the $1,000+ going rate from resellers. It’s probably one of these collectibles, that if left unopened for a very long time, becomes their own retirement account over time.

LEGO has a 7541 Pieces Millennium Falcon on Amazon.

Image result for LEGO 7,500+ Piece Millenium Falcon

Is this the most expensive most Lego set of all-time?

In case you are wondering no I have never completed it and I don’t have it. But it’s cool.

Falcon pieces

Martin J. Whitman – Value Investor

Martin Whitman, an incredible value investor and teacher, passed away at 93 years old (Business Wire). Below are a short compilation of links on the value investing legend. The shareholder letters are great. I learned a lot from Martin. You can more investment wisdom by other great investors archived here.

“The financial world is so complex and unpredictable that a fair amount of our analyses will prove to have been flawed…. A dirt-cheap price is an anchor to windward against misperceiving current situations, or being unable to make accurate forecasts.”

—Marty Whitman